“This was a match made in heaven! The moisturiser I carry in my handbag is APPELLES.”

 

Alexandra is a Sydney based illustrator, designer and afternoon tea enthusiast. She has a background in fashion but moved into illustrations after starting her own recipe blog The Art of Afternoon Tea.

Currently working on privately commissioned and commercial illustrations and fashion design projects, Alexandra also juggles being the Creative Patron and Ambassador for The Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation and her most important role to date, being a Mum of 2.

 

Using inspiration from fresh flowers, Alexandra first creates a graphite sketch and begins to add shading to the drawing.

She finds inspiration in many different ways, including the way the light hits an everyday object in the home, creating a beautiful magic moment. Alexandra tends to be drawn to old-world charm and vintage objects, items that have been lovingly hand-crafted, unique in style and have slight quirks. You may even find her off the beaten track in search for the hidden gem of an antique store.

“Down the path less trodden is my preferred direction of exploration for inspiration!”

 

 

From the graphite sketches, Alexandra transforms the artwork using soft colouring, adding extra tonal elements layer by layer.

She works with coloured pencils and does all of the shading by hand to bring the piece to life. 

“Without a doubt, Botanicals are my all time favourite things to illustrate.”

Her favourite flowers? Hydrangeas, Magnolias, Camellias and Peach blossoms 

 

Now the illustrations have blossomed, Alexandra converts the finished artwork so the botanicals can be used on our Christmas boxes. 

An illustration from start to completion can take anywhere between 1 day to 2-3 weeks depending on the intensiveness of the project. Alexandra also focuses not only on the illustration itself but the negative empty space on the page, which is just as important to the overall composition.

When Alexandra needs to stop and smell the roses, she loves the scents of freesias, mangoes, pine needles and rain storms on the grass after a hot summer day.